Comparing the executive function ability of autistic and non-autistic adolescents with a manualised battery of neuropsychological tasks

Lorcan Kenny*, Anna Remington, Elizabeth Pellicano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Performance on a single executive function (EF) task (e.g., a card sorting task) is often taken to represent ability on the underlying subcomponent of EF (e.g., set shifting) without accounting for the non-specific and non-executive skills employed to complete the task. This study used a manualised battery of EF tasks to derive individual task scores and latent EF scores. Seventy-nine adolescents aged between 11 and 19 years, including 37 autistic and 42 non-autistic participants, matched on cognitive ability, completed the battery. Autistic adolescents had moderate global EF difficulties and had significantly more difficulties on some individual tasks. However, the samples did not differ on any of the specific individual subcomponents of EF (fluency, cognitive control and working memory).

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Early online date20 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • executive function
  • NIH-EXAMINER battery
  • adolescent
  • cognitive ability

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