Comparison of fall-related traumatic brain injury in residential aged care and community-dwelling older people: a population-based study

Lara A. Harvey, Rebecca Mitchell, Henry Brodaty, Brian Draper, Jacqueline C.T. Close

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To compare trends, causes, and outcomes of fall-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) between community-dwelling (CD) individuals and residential aged care facility (RACF) residents. Methods: Hospitalisation and RACF administrative data for 6635 individuals aged ≥65 years admitted to all NSW hospitals for fall-related TBI from 2008–2009 to 2012–2013 were linked. Results: Of the 6944 hospitalisations, 20.8% were for RACF residents. Age-standardised hospitalisation rates were almost fourfold higher for RACF residents than CD individuals (standardised rate ratio 3.7; 95% CI 3.4–4.1); but increased at a similar annual rate of 9.2% (95% CI 0.3–19.0) and 7.2% (95% CI 5.6–8.9), respectively. Compared to CD individuals: a higher proportion of falls in RACF residents were furniture-related (21.4% vs 9.9%); resulted in haemorrhage (82.5% vs 73.7%); and death (23.1% vs 14.9%). Overall, 7.7% of hospitalisations for CD individuals resulted in new permanent RACF placement. Conclusion: Residential aged care facility residents have higher hospitalisation rates and poorer health outcomes than their CD counterparts.

LanguageEnglish
Pages144-150
Number of pages7
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

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Independent Living
Hospitalization
Population
Interior Design and Furnishings
Traumatic Brain Injury
Hemorrhage
Health

Keywords

  • falls
  • frail elderly
  • data linkage
  • traumatic brain injury

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of fall-related traumatic brain injury in residential aged care and community-dwelling older people: a population-based study",
abstract = "Objective: To compare trends, causes, and outcomes of fall-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) between community-dwelling (CD) individuals and residential aged care facility (RACF) residents. Methods: Hospitalisation and RACF administrative data for 6635 individuals aged ≥65 years admitted to all NSW hospitals for fall-related TBI from 2008–2009 to 2012–2013 were linked. Results: Of the 6944 hospitalisations, 20.8{\%} were for RACF residents. Age-standardised hospitalisation rates were almost fourfold higher for RACF residents than CD individuals (standardised rate ratio 3.7; 95{\%} CI 3.4–4.1); but increased at a similar annual rate of 9.2{\%} (95{\%} CI 0.3–19.0) and 7.2{\%} (95{\%} CI 5.6–8.9), respectively. Compared to CD individuals: a higher proportion of falls in RACF residents were furniture-related (21.4{\%} vs 9.9{\%}); resulted in haemorrhage (82.5{\%} vs 73.7{\%}); and death (23.1{\%} vs 14.9{\%}). Overall, 7.7{\%} of hospitalisations for CD individuals resulted in new permanent RACF placement. Conclusion: Residential aged care facility residents have higher hospitalisation rates and poorer health outcomes than their CD counterparts.",
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Comparison of fall-related traumatic brain injury in residential aged care and community-dwelling older people : a population-based study. / Harvey, Lara A.; Mitchell, Rebecca; Brodaty, Henry; Draper, Brian; Close, Jacqueline C.T.

In: Australasian Journal on Ageing, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 144-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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