Comparison of health service use trajectories of residential aged care residents reviewed by a hospital avoidance program versus usual care

Luke Testa, James E. Hardy, Therese Jepson, Jeffrey Braithwaite, Rebecca J. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To compare health service use trajectories of residential aged care facility (RACF) residents reviewed by the Aged Care Rapid Response Team (ARRT) to RACF residents who received usual care.

Methods: A retrospective group-based trajectory analysis of RACF residents aged ≥65 years who were reviewed by ARRT during 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016 was conducted. Health service use trajectories were followed for two years to 30 June 2018 and compared to RACF residents aged ≥65 years who lived in the same Local Health District and received usual care.

Results: There were 2,245 ARRT-reviewed resident hospitalisations and 11,892 usual care resident hospital admissions during 2015−16. Trajectory analysis categorised ARRT-reviewed residents into four groups and usual care residents into three groups. Age, comorbid health conditions and dementia were predictors of group membership in both ARRT-reviewed RACF residents and usual care RACF residents. Additionally, gender predicted group membership in ARRT-reviewed RACF residents and fall-related injuries predicted group membership in usual care RACF residents.

Conclusion: The identification of health service use trajectories assists in understanding hospital use by older RACF residents and may offer guidance in the design of prevention measures, including hospital avoidance programs.
Original languageEnglish
Article number104293
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume93
Early online date10 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Comorbidity
  • Health services for the aged
  • Homes for the aged
  • Hospitalization
  • Long-term care

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