Composing web services using an agent factory

Debbie Richards, Sander van Splunter, Frances M. T. Brazier, Marta Sabou

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Web service composition can provide a value-chain between customers and suppliers. The increasing number of services, and thus possible combinations, demands the development of dynamic and automatic techniques for their composition. Current commercial solutions are limited and are primarily static and manual. Automation requires reasoning about (semantic descriptions of) the services. This paper describes our initial work which brings together agents, Web service and semantic Web technology. Our knowledge-based software engineering approach to the design of agents, known as the Agent Factory, is applied to the composition of Web services. Using semantic descriptions of Web services written in DAML-S, the design process in our Agent Factory derives a Web service configuration. This paper also includes some observations regarding our experiences with DAML-S, UDDI and WSDL for this purpose.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationExtending Web services technologies
Subtitle of host publicationthe use of multi-agent approaches
EditorsLawrence Cavedon, B Benatallah
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages229-251
Number of pages23
ISBN (Print)9780387233437
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Publication series

NameMultiagent systems, artificial societies, and simulated organizations
PublisherSpringer
Volume13

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    Richards, D., van Splunter, S., Brazier, F. M. T., & Sabou, M. (2004). Composing web services using an agent factory. In L. Cavedon, & B. Benatallah (Eds.), Extending Web services technologies: the use of multi-agent approaches (pp. 229-251). (Multiagent systems, artificial societies, and simulated organizations; Vol. 13). New York: Springer, Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-23344-X_11