Concurrent quantification of quinolinic, picolinic, and nicotinic acids using electron-capture negative-ion gas chromatography - Mass spectrometry

G. A. Smythe*, O. Braga, B. J. Brew, R. S. Grant, G. J. Guillemin, S. J. Kerr, D. W. Walker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quinolinic, picolinic, and nicotinic acids and nicotinamide are end products of the kynurenine pathway from L-tryptophan and are intermediates in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. These compounds are involved in complex interrelationships with inflammatory and apoptotic responses associated with neuronal cell damage and death in the central nervous system. To facilitate the study of these compounds, we have utilized gas chromatography - Mass spectrometry in electron capture negative ionization mode for their concurrent trace quantification in a single sample. Deuterium-labeled quinolinic, picolinic, and nicotinic acids were used as internal standards and the compounds were converted to their hexafluoroisopropyl esters prior to chromatography. Nicotinamide was readily quantified after conversion to nicotinic acid using gas-phase hydrolysis - A process which did not affect the deuterated internal standards. The on-column limit of quantification was less than 1 fmol for each of the analytes and calibration curves were linear. A packed column liner was used in the gas chromatograph inlet to effectively eliminate sample interference effects in the analysis of trace (femtomolar) levels of quinolinic acid. The method enables rapid and specific concurrent quantification of quinolinic, picolinic, and nicotinic acids in tissue extracts and physiological and culture media.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-26
Number of pages6
JournalAnalytical Biochemistry
Volume301
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Concurrent quantification of quinolinic, picolinic, and nicotinic acids using electron-capture negative-ion gas chromatography - Mass spectrometry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this