Connection, special objects and congruence

the perspectives of young children from disadvantaged communities on participation in early childhood education settings

Rebekah Grace*, Rosalind Walsh, Kelly Baird

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study contributes to child voice research that seeks to understand the early childhood education and care (ECEC) experiences of young children. Forty-seven children from seven disadvantaged communities in NSW Australia, including urban, rural and remote areas, participated in a face-to-face interview guided by Ecocultural theory. The children were asked to describe their experiences of the routines and activities of the ECEC service they attended. Analysis of the qualitative data revealed three main themes: connectedness (the importance to children of feeling connected to their peers and carers); special objects (the importance of things from home and ownership) and congruence (the extent to which the centre reflected or contradicted their home environment). Discussion of these findings includes implications for practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1176-1189
    Number of pages14
    JournalEarly Child Development and Care
    Volume188
    Issue number8
    Early online date7 Nov 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Keywords

    • early childhood education
    • preschool
    • disadvantage
    • child voice
    • qualitative

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