Conservation surgery and radiation therapy in early breast cancer - An update

Ellen Tailby, John Boyages

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background Multiple randomised trials and metaanalyses have supported the use of conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Following lumpectomy, RT has been shown to decrease the chance of local recurrence and improve overall survival when compared with lumpectomy alone. Objectives This update outlines the rationale and outcomes for CS and RT, whether a subgroup exists in which RT may be safely omitted, the process of RT, common side effects and their management, and the latest techniques in the field. Discussion Breast conservation remains an effective treatment for breast cancer without a survival disadvantage to a mastectomy. The combination of advanced imaging and fast three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy planning computer systems have allowed new techniques that deliver RT more accurately, with better tumour control, fewer side effects and improved survival.

LanguageEnglish
Pages214-219
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume46
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Radiotherapy
Breast Neoplasms
Segmental Mastectomy
Three-Dimensional Imaging
Mastectomy
Computer Systems
Breast
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Conservative Treatment

Cite this

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Conservation surgery and radiation therapy in early breast cancer - An update. / Tailby, Ellen; Boyages, John.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 46, No. 4, 2017, p. 214-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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