Contemporary fiddling in human geography while Rome burns: Has quantitative analysis been largely abandoned - and should it be?

Ron Johnston*, Les Hepple, Tony Hoare, Kelvyn Jones, Paul Plummer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chris Hamnett [Geoforum 34 (2003) 1] has certainly been provocative in his claim that the nature of much contemporary human geography means that the discipline 'will cease to be taken seriously in the world beyond the narrow confines of academe' (p. 1). Much of his critique focuses on what he terms 'post-modernism, new cultural geography and the interpretative turn' (p. 2) practiced by those he identifies as 'the new intellectual dilettanti' (p. 3). In responding, however, our concern is not with that aspect of his critique, but rather with Hamnett's misrepresentation of one section of contemporary human geography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-161
Number of pages5
JournalGeoforum
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2003

Keywords

  • Human geography
  • Quantitative analysis

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