Context-aware systems for chronic disease patients: scoping review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Context-aware systems, also known as context-sensitive systems, are computing applications designed to capture, interpret, and use contextual information and provide adaptive services according to the current context of use. Context-aware systems have the potential to support patients with chronic conditions; however, little is known about how such systems have been utilized to facilitate patient work. Objective: This study aimed to characterize the different tasks and contexts in which context-aware systems for patient work were used as well as to assess any existing evidence about the impact of such systems on health-related process or outcome measures. Methods: A total of 6 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ACM Digital, Web of Science, and Scopus) were scanned using a predefined search strategy. Studies were included in the review if they focused on patients with chronic conditions, involved the use of a context-aware system to support patients' health-related activities, and reported the evaluation of the systems by the users. Studies were screened by independent reviewers, and a narrative synthesis of included studies was conducted. Results: The database search retrieved 1478 citations; 6 papers were included, all published from 2009 onwards. The majority of the papers were quasi-experimental and involved pilot and usability testing with a small number of users; there were no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of a context-aware system. In the included studies, context was captured using sensors or self-reports, sometimes involving both. Most studies used a combination of sensor technology and mobile apps to deliver personalized feedback. A total of 3 studies examined the impact of interventions on health-related measures, showing positive results. Conclusions: The use of context-aware systems to support patient work is an emerging area of research. RCTs are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of context-aware systems in improving patient work, self-management practices, and health outcomes in chronic disease patients.

LanguageEnglish
Article numbere10896
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Chronic Disease
Health
Randomized Controlled Trials
Mobile Applications
Databases
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Self Care
MEDLINE
Self Report
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Technology
Research

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2019. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • chronic disease
  • medical informatics
  • mobile applications
  • self-care
  • self-management

Cite this

@article{52a2488b63b64495ba706836d24bde75,
title = "Context-aware systems for chronic disease patients: scoping review",
abstract = "Background: Context-aware systems, also known as context-sensitive systems, are computing applications designed to capture, interpret, and use contextual information and provide adaptive services according to the current context of use. Context-aware systems have the potential to support patients with chronic conditions; however, little is known about how such systems have been utilized to facilitate patient work. Objective: This study aimed to characterize the different tasks and contexts in which context-aware systems for patient work were used as well as to assess any existing evidence about the impact of such systems on health-related process or outcome measures. Methods: A total of 6 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ACM Digital, Web of Science, and Scopus) were scanned using a predefined search strategy. Studies were included in the review if they focused on patients with chronic conditions, involved the use of a context-aware system to support patients' health-related activities, and reported the evaluation of the systems by the users. Studies were screened by independent reviewers, and a narrative synthesis of included studies was conducted. Results: The database search retrieved 1478 citations; 6 papers were included, all published from 2009 onwards. The majority of the papers were quasi-experimental and involved pilot and usability testing with a small number of users; there were no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of a context-aware system. In the included studies, context was captured using sensors or self-reports, sometimes involving both. Most studies used a combination of sensor technology and mobile apps to deliver personalized feedback. A total of 3 studies examined the impact of interventions on health-related measures, showing positive results. Conclusions: The use of context-aware systems to support patient work is an emerging area of research. RCTs are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of context-aware systems in improving patient work, self-management practices, and health outcomes in chronic disease patients.",
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Context-aware systems for chronic disease patients : scoping review. / Yin, Kathleen; Laranjo, Liliana; Tong, Huong Ly; Lau, Annie Y. S.; Kocaballi, A. Baki; Martin, Paige; Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Coiera, Enrico.

In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 21, No. 6, e10896, 17.06.2019, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Context-aware systems for chronic disease patients

T2 - Journal of Medical Internet Research

AU - Yin,Kathleen

AU - Laranjo,Liliana

AU - Tong,Huong Ly

AU - Lau,Annie Y. S.

AU - Kocaballi,A. Baki

AU - Martin,Paige

AU - Vagholkar,Sanjyot

AU - Coiera,Enrico

N1 - Copyright the Author(s) 2019. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

PY - 2019/6/17

Y1 - 2019/6/17

N2 - Background: Context-aware systems, also known as context-sensitive systems, are computing applications designed to capture, interpret, and use contextual information and provide adaptive services according to the current context of use. Context-aware systems have the potential to support patients with chronic conditions; however, little is known about how such systems have been utilized to facilitate patient work. Objective: This study aimed to characterize the different tasks and contexts in which context-aware systems for patient work were used as well as to assess any existing evidence about the impact of such systems on health-related process or outcome measures. Methods: A total of 6 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ACM Digital, Web of Science, and Scopus) were scanned using a predefined search strategy. Studies were included in the review if they focused on patients with chronic conditions, involved the use of a context-aware system to support patients' health-related activities, and reported the evaluation of the systems by the users. Studies were screened by independent reviewers, and a narrative synthesis of included studies was conducted. Results: The database search retrieved 1478 citations; 6 papers were included, all published from 2009 onwards. The majority of the papers were quasi-experimental and involved pilot and usability testing with a small number of users; there were no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of a context-aware system. In the included studies, context was captured using sensors or self-reports, sometimes involving both. Most studies used a combination of sensor technology and mobile apps to deliver personalized feedback. A total of 3 studies examined the impact of interventions on health-related measures, showing positive results. Conclusions: The use of context-aware systems to support patient work is an emerging area of research. RCTs are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of context-aware systems in improving patient work, self-management practices, and health outcomes in chronic disease patients.

AB - Background: Context-aware systems, also known as context-sensitive systems, are computing applications designed to capture, interpret, and use contextual information and provide adaptive services according to the current context of use. Context-aware systems have the potential to support patients with chronic conditions; however, little is known about how such systems have been utilized to facilitate patient work. Objective: This study aimed to characterize the different tasks and contexts in which context-aware systems for patient work were used as well as to assess any existing evidence about the impact of such systems on health-related process or outcome measures. Methods: A total of 6 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ACM Digital, Web of Science, and Scopus) were scanned using a predefined search strategy. Studies were included in the review if they focused on patients with chronic conditions, involved the use of a context-aware system to support patients' health-related activities, and reported the evaluation of the systems by the users. Studies were screened by independent reviewers, and a narrative synthesis of included studies was conducted. Results: The database search retrieved 1478 citations; 6 papers were included, all published from 2009 onwards. The majority of the papers were quasi-experimental and involved pilot and usability testing with a small number of users; there were no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of a context-aware system. In the included studies, context was captured using sensors or self-reports, sometimes involving both. Most studies used a combination of sensor technology and mobile apps to deliver personalized feedback. A total of 3 studies examined the impact of interventions on health-related measures, showing positive results. Conclusions: The use of context-aware systems to support patient work is an emerging area of research. RCTs are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of context-aware systems in improving patient work, self-management practices, and health outcomes in chronic disease patients.

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KW - medical informatics

KW - mobile applications

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KW - self-management

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