Continuing cabazitaxel beyond 10 cycles for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: is there a benefit?

Loma Al-Mansouri*, Malmaruha Arasaratnam, Howard Gurney

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Cabazitaxel prolongs survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in the postdocetaxel setting. We investigate the benefit of continuing cabazitaxel beyond 10 cycles in patients who are clinically responding without significant toxicity. Methods: A comparison was made between patients who received cabazitaxel for >10 cycles and those who had ≤10 cycles. Overall survival (OS), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) changes and treatment-associated adverse events were evaluated. Results: The median OS was 9 months (range 0.75-59), with OS significantly higher in patients who received extended duration of treatment: 14 months (range 3-90) vs 7 months (range 1.3-21) in patients treated with 4-10 cycles (HR 0.28, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.74, p=0.01). PSA decline did not show a significant correlation with OS (PSA decline ≥50%, p=0.54). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in OS between patients who had a normal versus high ALP at baseline. There was no clear evidence of cumulative toxicity in those having >10 cycles. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were able to receive more than 10 cycles of cabazitaxel without clinically relevant cumulative toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-87
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Hospital Pharmacy
Volume28
Issue number2
Early online date14 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • cabazitaxel
  • duration of treatment
  • metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer
  • number of cycles
  • taxane
  • urological tumours

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