Continuity of care in the early years? Multiple and changeable child care arrangements in Australia

Jennifer Bowes, Sarah Wise, Linda Harrison, Anne Sanson, Judy Ungerer, Johanna Watson, Tracey Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Continuity of care in the early years of life has been seen as an essential component of good quality childcare. There has been a growing unease in the early childhood field, however, about the threat to continuity of care for young children posed by children's experience of many caregivers during their first three years. In particular, the phenomenon of multiple child care arrangements per week and changeable child care more than one regular care arrangement per week and changeable child care shifts over time in care arrangements are seen as increasing problems. It is helpful, however, to summarize the existing indications of risk that have been associated with multiple and changeable care. Some research indicates that multiple childcare arrangements may also he associated with problem outcomes for children. For example, studies have found that multiple and changeable childcare is associated with lower intelligence scores, poorer social relationships and more insecure attachment with mothers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-35
Number of pages6
JournalFamily Matters
Issue number64
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Continuity of care in the early years? Multiple and changeable child care arrangements in Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Bowes, J., Wise, S., Harrison, L., Sanson, A., Ungerer, J., Watson, J., & Simpson, T. (2003). Continuity of care in the early years? Multiple and changeable child care arrangements in Australia. Family Matters, (64), 30-35.