Continuous-wave mode locked yellow Raman laser at 559 nm based on a synchronously pumped KGW crystal

Eduardo Granados*, Helen M. Pask, David J. Spence

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

here is keen interest in ultrashort-pulse lasers that can operate at visible wavelengths, particularly between 500 and 600 nm, since these would extend the application of two-photon fluorescence microscopy to a wider range of biological molecules [1]. Raman shifting of conventional lasers to access new wavelengths is a common technique, often utilising a cavity around a Raman medium to resonate the Stokes wavelength(s). This has several significant advantages: it improves beam quality; it allows conversion of lower-power pulses and it provides control over the conversion and cascading of the SRS process to second and higher Stokes orders [2].
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages1-1
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)9781424440801
ISBN (Print)9781424440795
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009
EventCLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference - 2009 - Munich, Germany
Duration: 14 Jun 200919 Jun 2009

Other

OtherCLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference - 2009
CountryGermany
CityMunich
Period14/06/0919/06/09

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