Coping with information silos

An examination of the medication management process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs)

Research output: Contribution to journalConference paper

6 Citations (Scopus)
13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the actions of geographically dispersed process stakeholders (doctors, community pharmacists and RACFs) in order to cope with the information silos that exist within and across different settings. The study setting involved three metropolitan RACFs in Sydney, Australia and employed a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews, non-participant observations and artefact analysis. Findings showed that medication information was stored in silos which required specific actions by each setting to translate this information to fit their local requirements. A salient example of this was the way in which community pharmacists used the RACF medication charts to prepare residents' pharmaceutical records. This translation of medication information across settings was often accompanied by telephone or face-to-face conversations to cross-check, validate or obtain new information. Findings highlighted that technological interventions that work in silos can negatively impact the quality of medication management processes in RACF settings. The implementation of commercial software applications like electronic medication charts need to be appropriately integrated to satisfy the collaborative information requirements of the RACF medication process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-162
Number of pages7
JournalStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume204
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event22nd Australian National Health Informatics Conference, HIC 2014 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 11 Aug 201414 Aug 2014

    Fingerprint

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) and IOS Press 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this