Cortisol excretion and illness reporting: a psychophysiological study of business executives at home and at work

J. Bassett, R. Spillane*, B. Hocking

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports the results of a psychophysiological study of occupational distress among 14 male executives using measures of salivary cortisol - a 'stress' hormone. Rest-day baseline measures were tested against workday data (Monday, Wednesday, Friday). The study found that, relative to a rest-day baseline, cortisol excretion was significantly higher at work on Wednesday (but not on Monday or Friday) and on evenings after work. The results pointed to the situational nature of the cortisol responses and demonstrated the complex interaction between individuals and their home and work environments. Relationships between cortisol excretion and illness reporting are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-141
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational Health and Safety - Australia and New Zealand
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Illness reporting
  • Managers
  • Psychological effects
  • Stress

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