Crew Resource Management (CRM) in healthcare: the hidden benefits

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: The use of quantitative measures to evaluate the efficacy of team training interventions is a hangover from other industries. In healthcare, there are considerable benefits more from understanding the “why” associated with the success or failure of interventions than the “what”.
Aim: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of classroom- and simulation-based CRM courses, alone and in combination. This paper reports the qualitative findings of the study within the context of new theoretical paradigms that have not been put together previously.
Method: 157 recruits were randomised into one of four groups, consisting of three intervention groups and a control group. The intervention groups were then given a one-day classroom course, one day of simulation-based training, or in both. Pre- and post-test quantitative data were gathered on participant attitudes to working in teams, and post-test quantitative data were gathered on trainee reactions, knowledge and teamwork behaviours. Qualitative data were gathered by interviewing a sample of participants at the conclusion of
the evaluation. We processed these data by Kirkpatrick’s training evaluation model and Brunswik’s lens model and developed a new model for training evaluation.
Results: 10 participants were purposively selected and interviewed at the conclusion of the evaluation phase. Responses were analysed using a grounded theory framework.
Discussion: Benefits of the training included increased self-confidence and self-awareness of learners, and improved awareness of the roles and performance of fellow team members. The training was found to have a positive flow-on effect, however, this was limited by cultural barriers and perceived lack of management support for adoption in the workplace.
Conclusion: This study revealed the importance of qualitative data in determining the reasons underlying adoption of team training in the healthcare workplace.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-17
Number of pages17
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventOrganisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th) - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 15 Apr 201218 Apr 2012

Conference

ConferenceOrganisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th)
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period15/04/1218/04/12

Fingerprint

Workplace
Delivery of Health Care
Lenses
Industry
Healthcare Crew Resource Management
Control Groups
Grounded Theory
Simulation Training

Cite this

Clay-Williams, R., & Braithwaite, J. (2012). Crew Resource Management (CRM) in healthcare: the hidden benefits. 1-17. Paper presented at Organisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th), Dublin, Ireland.
Clay-Williams, Robyn ; Braithwaite, Jeffrey. / Crew Resource Management (CRM) in healthcare : the hidden benefits. Paper presented at Organisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th), Dublin, Ireland.17 p.
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Clay-Williams, R & Braithwaite, J 2012, 'Crew Resource Management (CRM) in healthcare: the hidden benefits' Paper presented at Organisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th), Dublin, Ireland, 15/04/12 - 18/04/12, pp. 1-17.

Crew Resource Management (CRM) in healthcare : the hidden benefits. / Clay-Williams, Robyn; Braithwaite, Jeffrey.

2012. 1-17 Paper presented at Organisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th), Dublin, Ireland.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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Clay-Williams R, Braithwaite J. Crew Resource Management (CRM) in healthcare: the hidden benefits. 2012. Paper presented at Organisational Behaviour in Healthcare conference (2012:8th), Dublin, Ireland.