Critical infrastructure information security: impacts of identity and related crimes

Rodger Jamieson, Lesley Land, Stephen Smith, Greg Stephens, Donald Winchester

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The physical and digital security of a nation's critical infrastructure is necessary for its citizens, commerce and their public and private owners' to conduct successful business transactions. A complicating factor towards this security is the multi-jurisdictional nature of some critical infrastructure assets e.g., telecommunications or financial systems. Information systems (IS) and information technology are playing an ever more important role in the security of a nation's (state, territory, or province's) critical infrastructure. This longitudinal study investigates public sector critical infrastructure incidents across nine sectors in an Australia state - New South Wales. The New South Wales State Government is the largest by full-time employees in Australia. An action research methodology was employed. Data was collected by online survey, complemented by interviews and secondary data searches. Results were reinforced from independent sources. Our main finding is that NSW State Government IS security incidents against critical infrastructure assets are decreasing in both nominal and relative terms over time as prevention techniques and solutions are increasingly becoming available. However, we must be cautious in making causal inferences or generalising to other organisational situations without further study investigating other exogenous determinants.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationPACIS 2009 proceedings
Subtitle of host publication13th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems : IT services in a global environment
Place of PublicationIndia
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
EventPacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (13th : 2009) - Hyderabad, India
Duration: 10 Jul 200912 Jul 2009

Conference

ConferencePacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (13th : 2009)
CityHyderabad, India
Period10/07/0912/07/09

Fingerprint

Computer crime
Critical infrastructures
Security of data
Information systems
Information technology
Telecommunication
Computer systems
Personnel
Industry

Keywords

  • Critical infrastructure
  • Cyber crime
  • Identity crime
  • IS security incidents

Cite this

Jamieson, R., Land, L., Smith, S., Stephens, G., & Winchester, D. (2009). Critical infrastructure information security: impacts of identity and related crimes. In PACIS 2009 proceedings: 13th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems : IT services in a global environment (pp. 1-13). India: Association for Information Systems.
Jamieson, Rodger ; Land, Lesley ; Smith, Stephen ; Stephens, Greg ; Winchester, Donald. / Critical infrastructure information security : impacts of identity and related crimes. PACIS 2009 proceedings: 13th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems : IT services in a global environment. India : Association for Information Systems, 2009. pp. 1-13
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Jamieson, R, Land, L, Smith, S, Stephens, G & Winchester, D 2009, Critical infrastructure information security: impacts of identity and related crimes. in PACIS 2009 proceedings: 13th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems : IT services in a global environment. Association for Information Systems, India, pp. 1-13, Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (13th : 2009), Hyderabad, India, 10/07/09.

Critical infrastructure information security : impacts of identity and related crimes. / Jamieson, Rodger; Land, Lesley; Smith, Stephen; Stephens, Greg; Winchester, Donald.

PACIS 2009 proceedings: 13th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems : IT services in a global environment. India : Association for Information Systems, 2009. p. 1-13.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

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Jamieson R, Land L, Smith S, Stephens G, Winchester D. Critical infrastructure information security: impacts of identity and related crimes. In PACIS 2009 proceedings: 13th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems : IT services in a global environment. India: Association for Information Systems. 2009. p. 1-13