Critical Theory and / as Political Theory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to problematise the long-standing suspicions of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy by Critical Theorists, so that one may question the boundaries that are often erected within Critical Theory in relation to Political Philosophy, and thereby encourage Critical Theorists to engage more substantially with the latter. In the first section, I summarise the defining features of the research programme that the name of Critical Theory designates. I summarise the key features of the Critical Theory project to then highlight, in the second section, the different ways in which political dimensions are entailed in it. I distinguish a number of senses of politics that Critical Theory takes an interest in, as a direct result of its project. In the third section, I briefly recall the methodological, conceptual and political reasons explaining why, throughout the generations, Critical Theorists have been suspicious of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy. In order to justify these claims and the call for greater cooperation between the traditions, I highlight, in the fourth section of this chapter, a number of areas in which work in Critical Theory has shown itself to be relatively under-determined on political issues. In the final section, I provide some suggestions for how contemporary Critical Theory might address some of its deficits in the treatment of political questions, by engaging with authors situated outside the tradition.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationHegel and the Frankfurt School
EditorsPaul Giladi
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Group
Publication statusAccepted/In press - May 2020

Fingerprint

critical theory
political theory
political philosophy
deficit
politics

Keywords

  • Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, 1770-1831
  • Critical Theory
  • political theory
  • political philosophy

Cite this

Deranty, J-P. (Accepted/In press). Critical Theory and / as Political Theory. In P. Giladi (Ed.), Hegel and the Frankfurt School Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.
Deranty, Jean-Philippe. / Critical Theory and / as Political Theory. Hegel and the Frankfurt School. editor / Paul Giladi. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, 2020.
@inbook{d2661a3187804f959d660a0a48f28d69,
title = "Critical Theory and / as Political Theory",
abstract = "The purpose of this chapter is to problematise the long-standing suspicions of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy by Critical Theorists, so that one may question the boundaries that are often erected within Critical Theory in relation to Political Philosophy, and thereby encourage Critical Theorists to engage more substantially with the latter. In the first section, I summarise the defining features of the research programme that the name of Critical Theory designates. I summarise the key features of the Critical Theory project to then highlight, in the second section, the different ways in which political dimensions are entailed in it. I distinguish a number of senses of politics that Critical Theory takes an interest in, as a direct result of its project. In the third section, I briefly recall the methodological, conceptual and political reasons explaining why, throughout the generations, Critical Theorists have been suspicious of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy. In order to justify these claims and the call for greater cooperation between the traditions, I highlight, in the fourth section of this chapter, a number of areas in which work in Critical Theory has shown itself to be relatively under-determined on political issues. In the final section, I provide some suggestions for how contemporary Critical Theory might address some of its deficits in the treatment of political questions, by engaging with authors situated outside the tradition.",
keywords = "Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, 1770-1831, Critical Theory, political theory, political philosophy",
author = "Jean-Philippe Deranty",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
language = "English",
editor = "Paul Giladi",
booktitle = "Hegel and the Frankfurt School",
publisher = "Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Deranty, J-P 2020, Critical Theory and / as Political Theory. in P Giladi (ed.), Hegel and the Frankfurt School. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.

Critical Theory and / as Political Theory. / Deranty, Jean-Philippe.

Hegel and the Frankfurt School. ed. / Paul Giladi. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group, 2020.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Critical Theory and / as Political Theory

AU - Deranty, Jean-Philippe

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - The purpose of this chapter is to problematise the long-standing suspicions of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy by Critical Theorists, so that one may question the boundaries that are often erected within Critical Theory in relation to Political Philosophy, and thereby encourage Critical Theorists to engage more substantially with the latter. In the first section, I summarise the defining features of the research programme that the name of Critical Theory designates. I summarise the key features of the Critical Theory project to then highlight, in the second section, the different ways in which political dimensions are entailed in it. I distinguish a number of senses of politics that Critical Theory takes an interest in, as a direct result of its project. In the third section, I briefly recall the methodological, conceptual and political reasons explaining why, throughout the generations, Critical Theorists have been suspicious of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy. In order to justify these claims and the call for greater cooperation between the traditions, I highlight, in the fourth section of this chapter, a number of areas in which work in Critical Theory has shown itself to be relatively under-determined on political issues. In the final section, I provide some suggestions for how contemporary Critical Theory might address some of its deficits in the treatment of political questions, by engaging with authors situated outside the tradition.

AB - The purpose of this chapter is to problematise the long-standing suspicions of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy by Critical Theorists, so that one may question the boundaries that are often erected within Critical Theory in relation to Political Philosophy, and thereby encourage Critical Theorists to engage more substantially with the latter. In the first section, I summarise the defining features of the research programme that the name of Critical Theory designates. I summarise the key features of the Critical Theory project to then highlight, in the second section, the different ways in which political dimensions are entailed in it. I distinguish a number of senses of politics that Critical Theory takes an interest in, as a direct result of its project. In the third section, I briefly recall the methodological, conceptual and political reasons explaining why, throughout the generations, Critical Theorists have been suspicious of classical and contemporary Political Philosophy. In order to justify these claims and the call for greater cooperation between the traditions, I highlight, in the fourth section of this chapter, a number of areas in which work in Critical Theory has shown itself to be relatively under-determined on political issues. In the final section, I provide some suggestions for how contemporary Critical Theory might address some of its deficits in the treatment of political questions, by engaging with authors situated outside the tradition.

KW - Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, 1770-1831

KW - Critical Theory

KW - political theory

KW - political philosophy

M3 - Chapter

BT - Hegel and the Frankfurt School

A2 - Giladi, Paul

PB - Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group

ER -

Deranty J-P. Critical Theory and / as Political Theory. In Giladi P, editor, Hegel and the Frankfurt School. Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. 2020