Cross-disciplinary curation of rocks and art, neither rock art nor rocket science

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract

    Abstract

    Neil Frazer is an Australian artist who has exhibited extensively in Australia and New Zealand since the mid-1980s and is recognised for his large scale canvases, encompassing abstraction and figuration. A common theme in his works is coastal landscapes. A donation of several works to the Macquarie University Art Gallery provided an opportunity to match works with items selected from the university’s geology collection. After contact with the artist it was established that works were not situated geographically but were instead evocative of multiple places and the artist was seeking emotive and spiritual engagement with the landforms represented. Rock specimens were selected and interpretive text written so they would complement the nature of the landscapes represented in Frazer’s work. Text was written to explore ideas surrounding landscape formation from a geological perspective regardless of an audience’s pre-existing knowledge. The exercise shows the value of juxtaposing unlikely types of objects to promote new ways of conceptualising an understanding of the environment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe knowledgeable object
    Subtitle of host publicationprogram, published abstracts
    PublisherMacquarie University
    Pages9
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 27 Nov 2018
    EventThe Knowledgeable Object - Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
    Duration: 27 Nov 201828 Nov 2018
    http://events.mq.edu.au/events/the-knowledgeable-object/event-summary-880adbab9e1f4d9489e014c489e646f3.aspx

    Conference

    ConferenceThe Knowledgeable Object
    CountryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period27/11/1828/11/18
    Internet address

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