Cultural capital

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Economists traditionally distinguish between three forms of capital: physical capital, human capital and natural capital. This paper proposes a fourth type of capital, cultural capital. An item of cultural capital is defined as an asset embodying cultural value. The paper considers usage of the term "cultural capital" in other discourses, notably sociology after Bourdieu, and contrasts these with the proposed usage in economics. The relationship between cultural and economic value, upon which the economic concept of cultural capital relies, is explored, and the possible implications of cultural capital for economic analysis discussed, including issues of growth, sustainability and investment appraisal. The paper concludes with some suggestions for further theoretical and empirical research.

LanguageEnglish
Pages3-12
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cultural Economics
Volume23
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Cultural capital
Economics
Cultural values
Assets
Empirical research
Economists
Sociology
Investment appraisal
Natural capital
Human capital
Economic analysis
Discourse
Economic value
Physical capital
Sustainability

Keywords

  • Cultural capital
  • Cultural economics
  • Economic growth
  • Natural capital
  • Sustainability

Cite this

Throsby, David. / Cultural capital. In: Journal of Cultural Economics. 1999 ; Vol. 23, No. 1-2. pp. 3-12.
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Throsby, D 1999, 'Cultural capital', Journal of Cultural Economics, vol. 23, no. 1-2, pp. 3-12.

Cultural capital. / Throsby, David.

In: Journal of Cultural Economics, Vol. 23, No. 1-2, 1999, p. 3-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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