Cultural influences on the relationship between self-concept, interest, task-focused behavior, and reading skills

Tomohiro Inoue*, George K. Georgiou, Hisao Maekawa, Rauno Parrila

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the relations between reading self-concept, reading interest, task-focused behavior, and reading skills, and whether culture moderates their relations in a longitudinal study across Western (Canadian) and East Asian (Japanese) cultural contexts. Three hundred six children were assessed on reading self-concept and reading interest at the beginning of Grade 2, and on reading skills at the beginning and end of Grade 2. Teachers rated the children’s task-focused behavior at the beginning of Grade 2. Results showed that whereas task-focused behavior was uniquely associated with reading skills in both samples, the association between reading self-concept and reading skills was stronger in the Canadian sample than in the Japanese sample. Moreover, reading self-concept had an indirect effect on later reading skills via the effects of task-focused behavior and reading skills only in the Canadian sample. These findings suggest that while it is likely that there is a positive association between motivation and reading skills, the developmental dynamics between them may not be the same across the two cultures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cultural Cognitive Science
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural
  • Interest
  • Motivation
  • Reading
  • Self-concept
  • Task-focused behavior

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