Cumulative patellofemoral force and stress are lower during faster running compared to slower running in recreational runners

Eoin W. Doyle, Tim L. A. Doyle, Jason Bonacci, Aaron J. Beach, Joel T. Fuller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Management strategies for patellofemoral pain often involve modifying running distance or speed. However, the optimal modification strategy to manage patellofemoral joint (PFJ) force and stress accumulated during running warrants further investigation. This study investigated the effect of running speed on peak and cumulative PFJ force and stress in recreational runners. Twenty recreational runners ran on an instrumented treadmill at four speeds (2.5-4.2 m/s). A musculoskeletal model derived peak and cumulative (per 1 km of continuous running) PFJ force and stress for each speed. Cumulative PFJ force and stress decreased with faster speeds (9.3-33.6% reduction for 3.1-4.2 m/s vs. 2.5 m/s). Peak PFJ force and stress significantly increased with faster speeds (9.3-35.6% increase for 3.1-4.2 m/s vs. 2.5 m/s). The largest cumulative PFJ kinetics reductions occurred when speeds increased from 2.5 to 3.1 m/s (13.7-14.2%). Running at faster speeds increases the magnitude of peak PFJ kinetics but conversely results in less accumulated force over a set distance. Selecting moderate running speeds (~3.1 m/s) with reduced training duration or an interval-based approach may be more effective for managing cumulative PFJ kinetics compared to running at slow speeds.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalSports Biomechanics
Early online date26 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Jun 2023

Keywords

  • running
  • speed
  • kinetics
  • patellofemoral joint
  • knee

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cumulative patellofemoral force and stress are lower during faster running compared to slower running in recreational runners'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this