Current approaches to quantifying tonic and reflex autonomic outflows controlling cardiovascular function in humans and experimental animals

Ibrahim M. Salman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of the autonomic nervous system in the pathophysiology of human and experimental models of cardiovascular disease is well established. In the recent years, there have been some rapid developments in the diagnostic approaches used to assess and monitor autonomic functions. Although most of these methods are devoted for research purposes in laboratory animals, many have still found their way to routine clinical practice. To name a few, direct long-term telemetry recording of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in rodents, single-unit SNA recording using microneurography in human subjects and spectral analysis of blood pressure and heart rate in both humans and animals have recently received an overwhelming attention. In this article, we therefore provide an overview of the methods and techniques used to assess tonic and reflex autonomic functions in humans and experimental animals, highlighting current advances available and procedure description, limitations and usefulness for diagnostic purposes.
Original languageEnglish
Article number84
Pages (from-to)84-1-84-18
Number of pages18
JournalCurrent Hypertension Reports
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • autonomic reflexes
  • sympathetic nerve activity
  • parasympathetic nerve activity
  • blood pressure
  • heart rate
  • cardiovascular function

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