Death and lightness

using a demographic model to find support verbs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Some verbs have a particular kind of binary ambiguity: they can carry their normal, full meaning, or they can be merely acting as a prop for the nominal object. It has been suggested that there is a detectable pattern in the relationship between a verb acting as a prop (a \term{support verb}) and the noun it supports.
The task this paper undertakes is to develop a model which identifies the support verb for a particular noun, and by extension, when nouns are enumerated, a model which disambiguates a verb with respect to its support status. The paper sets up a basic model as a standard for comparison; it then proposes a more complex model, and gives some results to support the model's validity, comparing it with other similar approaches.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCSNLP '96
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the Fifth International Conference on the Cognitive Science of Natural Language Processing
EditorsA. I. C. Monaghan
Place of PublicationDublin, Ireland
PublisherDublin City University Natural Language Group
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9781872327099
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventInternational Conference on the Cognitive Science of Natural Language Processing (5th : 1996) - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 1 Jan 19961 Jan 1996

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on the Cognitive Science of Natural Language Processing (5th : 1996)
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period1/01/961/01/96

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  • Cite this

    Dras, M., & Johnson, M. (1996). Death and lightness: using a demographic model to find support verbs. In A. I. C. Monaghan (Ed.), CSNLP '96: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on the Cognitive Science of Natural Language Processing Dublin, Ireland: Dublin City University Natural Language Group.