Decentring fortress Australia

borderland geographies as relational spaces

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

    Abstract

    This paper looks to the geographies of Australia’s northern borderlands to theorise borders as relational spaces through which identities are (re)created and performed. Dominant Australian perspectives on borders are influenced by a legacy of exclusion and fear including the concept of terra nullius. This fear has been reinforced through the Australian government’s response to asylum seekers in the form of the Pacific Solution. Alternative perspectives of borderlands as sites of coexistence, complexity and situated engagement challenge this dominant conception of borderlands. Seeing borderlands as relational spaces allows for an understanding of borders as having the potential for inclusion or exclusion, as flexible and rigid, as based on fear or respect, depending on the relationships of power at work. We draw upon post-colonial and indigenous studies literature with a case study of the Tiwi Islands to argue that interconnected issues of power and identity are central to reimagining borders and borderlands.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the ARCRNSISS Methodology, Tools and techniques and Spatial Theory Paradigm Forums Workshop
    EditorsP. O'Neill, G. Wrightson
    Place of PublicationNewcastle
    PublisherUniversity of Newcastle
    Pages217-228
    Number of pages12
    ISBN (Print)1920701699
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    EventARCRNSISS Methodology, Tools and Techniques and Spatial Theory Paradigm Forums Workshop - Newcastle, N.S.W.
    Duration: 15 Jun 200517 Jun 2005

    Workshop

    WorkshopARCRNSISS Methodology, Tools and Techniques and Spatial Theory Paradigm Forums Workshop
    CityNewcastle, N.S.W.
    Period15/06/0517/06/05

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Decentring fortress Australia: borderland geographies as relational spaces'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Suchet-Pearson, S., Lloyd, K., & Wright, S. (2007). Decentring fortress Australia: borderland geographies as relational spaces. In P. O'Neill, & G. Wrightson (Eds.), Proceedings of the ARCRNSISS Methodology, Tools and techniques and Spatial Theory Paradigm Forums Workshop (pp. 217-228). Newcastle: University of Newcastle.