Degenerate oligonucleotide gene shuffling (DOGS) and random drift mutagenesis (RNDM): two complementary techniques for enzyme evolution

Peter Bergquist, RA Reeves, MD Gibbs

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    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Improvement of the biochemical characteristics of enzymes has been aided by misincorporation mutagenesis and DNA shuffling. Many gene shuffling techniques result predominantly in the regeneration of unshuffled (parental) molecules. We describe a procedure for gene shuffling using degenerate primers that allows control of the relative levels of recombination between the genes that are shuffled, and reduces the regeneration of unshuffled parental genes. This shuffling procedure avoids the use of endonucleases for gene fragmentation prior to shuffling and allows the inclusion of random mutagenesis of selected portions of the chimeric genes as part of the procedure. We illustrate the use of the shuffling technique with a family of beta-xylanase genes that possess widely different G + C contents. In addition, we introduce a new method (RNDM) for rapid screening of mutants from libraries where no adaptive selection has been imposed on the cells. They are identified only by their retention of enzymatic activity. The combination of RNDM followed by DOGS allows a comprehensive exploration of a protein's functional sequence space. (C) 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)63-72
    Number of pages10
    JournalBiomolecular engineering
    Volume22
    Issue number1-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

    Keywords

    • polymerase chain reaction
    • primer extension
    • in vitro evolution
    • gene shuffling
    • flow cytometry
    • random mutation
    • BACILLUS-CIRCULANS XYLANASE
    • DIRECTED EVOLUTION
    • BINDING DOMAINS
    • KRAFT PULP
    • IDENTIFICATION
    • EXPRESSION
    • BACTERIAL
    • SEQUENCE
    • PK(A)
    • CELLS

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