Delivering youth-specific mental health services: The advantages of a collaborative, multi-disciplinary system

Elizabeth Scott, Sharon Naismith, Bradley Whitwell, Blake Hamilton, Catherine Chudleigh, Ian Hickie*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Evidence suggests that quality mental health care is based on well-integrated multi-disciplinary care provided by a range of mental health, substance use, and general healthcare clinicians. There is a growing focus in Australia on providing this type of mental health care to young people, particularly those in the early stages of a major disorder. The development of such services has proceeded on the basis of limited service-based data and has also been impeded by current healthcare funding structures. Methods: This report outlines the service characteristics of three models: a traditional 'fee for service' model, a specialized youth mental health clinic, and a new headspace multi-disciplinary site in South Western Sydney.Results: Naturalistic data from these three services collected during their developmental phase indicate that each model is associated with differential demographic, illness and service organization characteristics. Conclusions: Compared with 'fee-for-service' type care, specialized youth models provide greater access to a broad range of multi-disciplinary clinicians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-194
Number of pages6
JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Collaborative care
  • Headspace
  • Mental health services
  • Youth

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