Design and development of an internet-delivered self-management course to increase physical activity after acquired brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

Purpose:Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) from events such as stroke results in high levels of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior. We undertook a series of studies to design, develop and test an innovative self-management course to increase physical activity after ABI.
Methods:A systematic, mixed methods approach was utilised, including a systematic review of the literature and targeted needs analysis of potential users via online survey. The results were synthesised with current models of behavior change, to inform the design of a theoretical model for an active lifestyle and development of the myMoves course.
Results/findings:The systematic review showed a scarcity of self-management programs to increase physical activity after ABI. The survey of 59 Australian ABI survivors found common barriers were pain (36.6%), fatigue (29.3%) and fear (26.8%). Over 74% of participants reported they were interested in a self-management program to increase physical activity. The Active Lifestyle Model was designed with four core areas focused on managing Activity Levels, Barriers, Expectations and Habits. The internet-delivered self-management course, myMoves, was built around this framework - comprising 6 Lessons delivered over 8 weeks with accompanying Case Stories and Worksheets to enhance knowledge and build skills taught over the course. Feasibility testing of this course is currently underway.
Conclusions:An iterative process of design and development has resulted in an innovative self-management course aimed at increasing physical activity after ABI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36
Number of pages1
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume10
Issue numberSuppl. 3
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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