Design options, implementation issues and evaluating success of ecologically engineered shorelines

Rebecca L. Morris, Eliza C. Heery, Lynette H. L. Loke, Edward Lau, Elisabeth M. A. Strain, Laura Airoldi, Karen A. Alexander, Melanie J. Bishop, Ross A. Coleman, Jeffery R. Cordell, Yun-Wei Dong, Louise B. Firth, Stephen J. Hawkins, Tom Heath, Michael Kokora, Shing Yip Lee, Jon K. Miller, Shimrit Perkol-Finkel, Andrew Rella, Peter D. Steinberg & 5 others Ichiro Takeuchi, Richard C. Thompson, Peter A. Todd, Jason D. Toft, Kenneth M. Y. Leung

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)
30 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Human population growth and accelerating coastal development have been the drivers for unprecedented construction of artificial structures along shorelines globally. Construction has been recently amplified by societal responses to reduce flood and erosion risks from rising sea levels and more extreme storms resulting from climate change. Such structures, leading to highly modified shorelines, deliver societal benefits, but they also create significant socioeconomic and environmental challenges. The planning, design and deployment of these coastal structures should aim to provide multiple goals through the application of ecoengineering to shoreline development. Such developments should be designed and built with the overarching objective of reducing negative impacts on nature, using hard, soft and hybrid ecological engineering approaches. The design of ecologically sensitive shorelines should be context-dependent and combine engineering, environmental and socioeconomic considerations. The costs and benefits of ecoengineered shoreline design options should be considered across all three of these disciplinary domains when setting objectives, informing plans for their subsequent maintenance and management and ultimately monitoring and evaluating their success. To date, successful ecoengineered shoreline projects have engaged with multiple stakeholders (e.g. architects, engineers, ecologists, coastal/port managers and the general public) during their conception and construction, but few have evaluated engineering, ecological and socioeconomic outcomes in a comprehensive manner. Increasing global awareness of climate change impacts (increased frequency or magnitude of extreme weather events and sea level rise), coupled with future predictions for coastal development (due to population growth leading to urban development and renewal, land reclamation and establishment of renewable energy infrastructure in the sea) will increase the demand for adaptive techniques to protect coastlines. In this review, we present an overview of current ecoengineered shoreline design options, the drivers and constraints that influence implementation and factors to consider when evaluating the success of such ecologically engineered shorelines.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOceanography and marine biology
Subtitle of host publicationan annual review, volume 57
EditorsS. J. Hawkins, A. L. Allcock, A. E. Bates, L. B. Firth, I. P. Smith, S. E. Swearer, P. A. Todd
Place of PublicationBoca Raton
PublisherCRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter4
Pages169-228
Number of pages60
ISBN (Electronic)9780429026379
ISBN (Print)9780367134150
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Publication series

NameOceanography and Marine Biology
Volume57
ISSN (Print)0078-3218

Bibliographical note

Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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  • Cite this

    Morris, R. L., Heery, E. C., Loke, L. H. L., Lau, E., Strain, E. M. A., Airoldi, L., ... Leung, K. M. Y. (2019). Design options, implementation issues and evaluating success of ecologically engineered shorelines. In S. J. Hawkins, A. L. Allcock, A. E. Bates, L. B. Firth, I. P. Smith, S. E. Swearer, & P. A. Todd (Eds.), Oceanography and marine biology: an annual review, volume 57 (pp. 169-228). (Oceanography and Marine Biology; Vol. 57). Boca Raton: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780429026379-4