Desire to drink in low- and high-risk social drinkers: An experimental analogue of impaired control

Nicole K. Lee*, Janet D. Greeley, Tian P S Oei, Angela J. Dean

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This study used a novel cue exposure paradigm to investigate the differences between high- and low-risk drinkers in their desire to drink during a drinking session. Fifty-three self-selected participants were assigned to high- or low-risk drinking groups based on their self-reported consumption of alcohol, then compared on their desire to drink over a 90 min paced drinking session. High-risk drinkers showed increasing desire over the session, while low-risk drinkers' desire began to decrease after only a short drinking period. The perceived and actual effects of the alcohol did not appear to be able to account for the difference. Results are discussed with reference to issues of impaired control. Suggestions for future research directions are also offered.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)115-124
    Number of pages10
    JournalAddiction Research and Theory
    Volume12
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

    Keywords

    • Alcohol
    • Impaired control
    • Social drinkers

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