Detecting extrasolar planets with sparse aperture masking

Michael J. Ireland*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Extrasolar planets are directly detected most easily when they are young and can have contrasts only a few hundred times fainter than their host stars at near- and mid- infrared wavelengths. However, planets and other solar-system scale structures around solar-type stars in the nearest star forming regions require the full diffraction limit of the world's largest telescopes, and can not be detected with conventional AO imaging techniques. I will describe the recent successes of long-baseline interferometry in detecting planetary-mass companions, focusing on the transitional disk system LkCa 15. I will outline why aperture-masking has been so successful in its resolution and sensitivity niche, and will outline the algorithms needed to calibrate the primary observable of closure/kernel phase to the level needed for extrasolar planet detection.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOptical and Infrared Interferometry III
EditorsFrançoise Delplancke, Jayadev K. Rajagopal, Fabien Malbet
Place of PublicationBellingham, Washington
PublisherSPIE
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
Volume8445
ISBN (Print)9780819491466
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventOptical and Infrared Interferometry III - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 1 Jul 20126 Jul 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
NumberPart one
Volume8445
ISSN (Electronic)0277-786X

Other

OtherOptical and Infrared Interferometry III
CountryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period1/07/126/07/12

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