Determining the structure of neighbourhood cohesion: Applying synthetic small area data in Sydney and Los Angeles

Kerstin Hermes*, Michael Poulsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social cohesion is an important determinant of functioning and healthy communities but its spatial distribution and relation to residential segregation within cities has not been adequately addressed due to the lack of small area data. A disconnect exists between the social capital and segregation literature. This paper presents how neighbourhood cohesion is spatially distributed in Sydney and Los Angeles using synthetic spatial microdata. The results indicate that Sydney has a relatively dense clustering of neighbourhood cohesion, whereas in Los Angeles it is more dispersed. In both cities, cohesion is highest in Anglo/white concentrations, and lowest in ethnically diverse areas. In Los Angeles, neighbourhood cohesion is significantly higher in African American concentrations than in Hispanic and Asian concentrations. Overall cohesion rises with the economic status in Los Angeles but not in Sydney.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-42
Number of pages23
JournalInternational Journal of Applied Geospatial Research
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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