Developing and implementing a state-wide Aboriginal health promotion program: the process and factors influencing successful delivery

Marilyn Wise, Luciana Massi, Miranda Rose, Hannah Nancarrow, Katherine Conigrave, Adrian Bauman, Shane Hearn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

ISSUE ADDRESSED: The prevalence of smoking among the adult Aboriginal population is almost double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Research shows smoking cessation brief interventions have a positive impact on quit attempts. However, examples of statewide, Aboriginal-led initiatives that ensure health service delivery of brief intervention to all Aboriginal clients are limited. METHODS: Guidance from an Aboriginal chief investigator and key health stakeholders supported the development of the NSW SmokeCheck Program. One component of the program was the establishment of a state-wide network of Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) and other health professional participants. Another was a culturally specific training program to strengthen the knowledge, skills, and confidence of participants to provide an evidence-based brief smoking-cessation intervention to Aboriginal clients. The brief intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, adapted for use in Aboriginal communities. RESULTS: SmokeCheck training reached 35.5% of the total NSW AHW workforce over a 15-month period. More than 90% of participants surveyed indicated satisfaction with the curriculum content, workshop structure and training delivery, agreeing that they found it relevant, easy to understand and applicable to practice. CONCLUSIONS: An evidence-based approach to designing and delivering an Aboriginal-specific health promotion intervention appears to have facilitated the development of a state-wide network of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal health professionals and strengthened their capacity to deliver a brief smoking cessation intervention with Aboriginal clients.
LanguageEnglish
Pages25-29
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Promotion Journal of Australia
Volume23
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Health Promotion
Smoking Cessation
Health
Health Manpower
Education
Curriculum
Population
Health Services
Smoking
Research Personnel
Research

Keywords

  • Aboriginal health promotion
  • building health system capacity
  • smoking cessation brief intervention
  • Aboriginal health worker

Cite this

Wise, Marilyn ; Massi, Luciana ; Rose, Miranda ; Nancarrow, Hannah ; Conigrave, Katherine ; Bauman, Adrian ; Hearn, Shane. / Developing and implementing a state-wide Aboriginal health promotion program : the process and factors influencing successful delivery. In: Health Promotion Journal of Australia. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 25-29.
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abstract = "ISSUE ADDRESSED: The prevalence of smoking among the adult Aboriginal population is almost double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Research shows smoking cessation brief interventions have a positive impact on quit attempts. However, examples of statewide, Aboriginal-led initiatives that ensure health service delivery of brief intervention to all Aboriginal clients are limited. METHODS: Guidance from an Aboriginal chief investigator and key health stakeholders supported the development of the NSW SmokeCheck Program. One component of the program was the establishment of a state-wide network of Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) and other health professional participants. Another was a culturally specific training program to strengthen the knowledge, skills, and confidence of participants to provide an evidence-based brief smoking-cessation intervention to Aboriginal clients. The brief intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, adapted for use in Aboriginal communities. RESULTS: SmokeCheck training reached 35.5{\%} of the total NSW AHW workforce over a 15-month period. More than 90{\%} of participants surveyed indicated satisfaction with the curriculum content, workshop structure and training delivery, agreeing that they found it relevant, easy to understand and applicable to practice. CONCLUSIONS: An evidence-based approach to designing and delivering an Aboriginal-specific health promotion intervention appears to have facilitated the development of a state-wide network of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal health professionals and strengthened their capacity to deliver a brief smoking cessation intervention with Aboriginal clients.",
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Wise, M, Massi, L, Rose, M, Nancarrow, H, Conigrave, K, Bauman, A & Hearn, S 2012, 'Developing and implementing a state-wide Aboriginal health promotion program: the process and factors influencing successful delivery', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 25-29.

Developing and implementing a state-wide Aboriginal health promotion program : the process and factors influencing successful delivery. / Wise, Marilyn; Massi, Luciana; Rose, Miranda; Nancarrow, Hannah; Conigrave, Katherine; Bauman, Adrian; Hearn, Shane.

In: Health Promotion Journal of Australia, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2012, p. 25-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Rose, Miranda

AU - Nancarrow, Hannah

AU - Conigrave, Katherine

AU - Bauman, Adrian

AU - Hearn, Shane

PY - 2012

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N2 - ISSUE ADDRESSED: The prevalence of smoking among the adult Aboriginal population is almost double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Research shows smoking cessation brief interventions have a positive impact on quit attempts. However, examples of statewide, Aboriginal-led initiatives that ensure health service delivery of brief intervention to all Aboriginal clients are limited. METHODS: Guidance from an Aboriginal chief investigator and key health stakeholders supported the development of the NSW SmokeCheck Program. One component of the program was the establishment of a state-wide network of Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) and other health professional participants. Another was a culturally specific training program to strengthen the knowledge, skills, and confidence of participants to provide an evidence-based brief smoking-cessation intervention to Aboriginal clients. The brief intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, adapted for use in Aboriginal communities. RESULTS: SmokeCheck training reached 35.5% of the total NSW AHW workforce over a 15-month period. More than 90% of participants surveyed indicated satisfaction with the curriculum content, workshop structure and training delivery, agreeing that they found it relevant, easy to understand and applicable to practice. CONCLUSIONS: An evidence-based approach to designing and delivering an Aboriginal-specific health promotion intervention appears to have facilitated the development of a state-wide network of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal health professionals and strengthened their capacity to deliver a brief smoking cessation intervention with Aboriginal clients.

AB - ISSUE ADDRESSED: The prevalence of smoking among the adult Aboriginal population is almost double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Research shows smoking cessation brief interventions have a positive impact on quit attempts. However, examples of statewide, Aboriginal-led initiatives that ensure health service delivery of brief intervention to all Aboriginal clients are limited. METHODS: Guidance from an Aboriginal chief investigator and key health stakeholders supported the development of the NSW SmokeCheck Program. One component of the program was the establishment of a state-wide network of Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) and other health professional participants. Another was a culturally specific training program to strengthen the knowledge, skills, and confidence of participants to provide an evidence-based brief smoking-cessation intervention to Aboriginal clients. The brief intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, adapted for use in Aboriginal communities. RESULTS: SmokeCheck training reached 35.5% of the total NSW AHW workforce over a 15-month period. More than 90% of participants surveyed indicated satisfaction with the curriculum content, workshop structure and training delivery, agreeing that they found it relevant, easy to understand and applicable to practice. CONCLUSIONS: An evidence-based approach to designing and delivering an Aboriginal-specific health promotion intervention appears to have facilitated the development of a state-wide network of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal health professionals and strengthened their capacity to deliver a brief smoking cessation intervention with Aboriginal clients.

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