Development of intentionality in the vocalization of handicapped infants reared in a hospital setting

Sandra Bochner*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In a longitudinal study of the vocal development of five handicapped infants who had been hospitalized soon after birth, examples of cry and noncry sounds collected at weekly intervals were analyzed in terms of selected features (e.g. mood, intent and target listener). Results suggested that for the three more delayed infants, vocalizing throughout the observed time period remained largely a form of protest or self-entertainment with some instances of social interaction. The two less handicapped infants, demonstrated acquisition of effective use of sounds in social interaction. It was concluded that the high rate of self-stimulatory vocalizing by the three more delayed infants may have inhibited the development of more appropriate vocal behaviour.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)55-63
    Number of pages9
    JournalAustralia and New Zealand Journal of Developmental Disabilities
    Volume12
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1986

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