Developmental neuroplasticity after cochlear implantation

Andrej Kral, Anu Sharma*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

305 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cortical development is dependent on stimulus-driven learning. The absence of sensory input from birth, as occurs in congenital deafness, affects normal growth and connectivity needed to form a functional sensory system, resulting in deficits in oral language learning. Cochlear implants bypass cochlear damage by directly stimulating the auditory nerve and brain, making it possible to avoid many of the deleterious effects of sensory deprivation. Congenitally deaf animals and children who receive implants provide a platform to examine the characteristics of cortical plasticity in the auditory system. In this review, we discuss the existence of time limits for, and mechanistic constraints on, sensitive periods for cochlear implantation and describe the effects of multimodal and cognitive reorganization that result from long-term auditory deprivation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-122
Number of pages12
JournalTrends in Neurosciences
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

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