Developmental systems theory

Paul E. Griffiths, Adam Hochman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary/reference book

Abstract

Developmental systems theory (DST) is a wholeheartedly epigenetic approach to development, inheritance and evolution. The developmental system of an organism is the entire matrix of resources that are needed to reproduce the life cycle. The range of developmental resources that are properly described as being inherited, and which are subject to natural selection, is far wider than has traditionally been allowed. Evolution acts on this extended set of developmental resources. From a developmental systems perspective, development does not proceed according to a preformed plan; what is inherited is much more than DNA; and evolution is change not only in gene frequencies, but in entire developmental systems.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationeLS
EditorsHildegard Kehrer-Sawatzki
Place of PublicationChichester, UK
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9780470015902
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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epigenetics
natural selection
gene frequency
inheritance (genetics)
life cycle (organisms)
organisms
DNA

Cite this

Griffiths, P. E., & Hochman, A. (2015). Developmental systems theory. In H. Kehrer-Sawatzki (Ed.), eLS (pp. 1-7). Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons. DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0003452.pub2
Griffiths, Paul E. ; Hochman, Adam. / Developmental systems theory. eLS. editor / Hildegard Kehrer-Sawatzki. Chichester, UK : John Wiley & Sons, 2015. pp. 1-7
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Griffiths, PE & Hochman, A 2015, Developmental systems theory. in H Kehrer-Sawatzki (ed.), eLS. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK, pp. 1-7. DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0003452.pub2

Developmental systems theory. / Griffiths, Paul E.; Hochman, Adam.

eLS. ed. / Hildegard Kehrer-Sawatzki. Chichester, UK : John Wiley & Sons, 2015. p. 1-7.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary/reference book

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Griffiths PE, Hochman A. Developmental systems theory. In Kehrer-Sawatzki H, editor, eLS. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons. 2015. p. 1-7. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/9780470015902.a0003452.pub2