Differences in responses to anti-smoking initiatives: evidence from the Australian National Health Surveys, 1989-2001

Julian de Meyrick, Farhat Yusuf

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

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Abstract

This paper looks at changing patterns of smoking behaviour (smoking prevalence, initiation and cessation) across the population of Australia in general and within specific demographic segments. It concludes that different segments have responded differently to a standard anti-smoking message strategy applied in a largely undifferentiated way, across the population. Overall smoking prevalence has not continued to decline in Australia, despite increasingly strident anti-smoking campaigns. Similarly the young people, especially young women, have continued to take up smoking. Males have been less likely to quit (become ex-smokers). This may suggest that current confidence that smoking prevalence will decline to zero, if the current standard strategy is maintained, may be misplaced. The data suggest that there is a need for a re-examination of social marketers’ anti-smoking segmentation strategy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAcademy of Marketing Conference London
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherMiddlesex University Business School
Pages1-11
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)1904750494
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventAcademy of Marketing Conference (2006) - London
Duration: 4 Jul 20066 Jul 2006

Conference

ConferenceAcademy of Marketing Conference (2006)
CityLondon
Period4/07/066/07/06

Keywords

  • smoking prevalence
  • anti-smoking
  • cessation
  • prevention
  • gender
  • age and income segments

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