Differences in the phototaxis of pollen and nectar foraging honey bees are related to their octopamine brain titers

Ricarda Scheiner*, Anna Toteva, Tina Reim, Eirik Søvik, Andrew B. Barron

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)
13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The biogenic amine octopamine is an important neuromodulator, neurohormone and neurotransmitter in insects. We here investigate the role of octopamine signaling in honey bee phototaxis. Our results show that groups of bees differ naturally in their phototaxis. Pollen forgers display a lower light responsiveness than nectar foragers. The lower phototaxis of pollen foragers coincides with higher octopamine titers in the optic lobes but is independent of octopamine receptor gene expression. Increasing octopamine brain titers reduces responsiveness to light, while tyramine application enhances phototaxis. These findings suggest an involvement of octopamine signaling in honey bee phototaxis and possibly division of labor, which is hypothesized to be based on individual differences in sensory responsiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author/s. This Document is protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.

Keywords

  • biogenic amines
  • tyramine
  • division of labor
  • honey bee
  • light responsiveness
  • insect
  • behavior

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differences in the phototaxis of pollen and nectar foraging honey bees are related to their octopamine brain titers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this