Diferenciación entre demencias en estadio inicial y depresión utilizando la versión española del Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination

Translated title of the contribution: Differentiating early dementia from major depression with the Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination

M. Roca, T. Torralva, P. López, J. Marengo, M. Cetkovich, Facundo Manes*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. In clinical practice is often difficult to establish whether cognitive impairment is secondary to an affective disorder or a dementing process. Aim. To describe the cognitive of performance on the Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) of patients with early dementia and depression. Subjects and methods. 77 patients with early dementia (53 Alzheimer disease; 24 frontotemporal dementia), 17 patients with major depression and 54 healthy volunteers were tested with the Spanish version of the ACE. Results. The Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia group were significantly lower than for the control group and for the major depression group. When the major depression group was compared with the NC group no significant differences were found. Conclusions. The cognitive performance in the ACE is different in patients with early dementia and patient with depression.

Translated title of the contributionDifferentiating early dementia from major depression with the Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)340-343
Number of pages4
JournalRevista de Neurologia
Volume46
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE)
  • Alzheimer-type dementia
  • Cognition
  • Cognitive screening
  • Depression
  • Frontotemporal dementia

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