Differentiation of functional constipation and constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome based on Rome III criteria: A population-based study

N. A. Koloski, M. Jones, M. Young, N. J. Talley*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    46 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: While the Rome III classification recognises functional constipation (FC) and constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) as distinct disorders, recent evidence has suggested that these disorders are difficult to separate in clinical practice. Aim: To identify whether clinical and lifestyle factors differentiate Rome III-defined IBS-C from FC based on gastrointestinal symptoms and lifestyle characteristics. Method: 3260 people randomly selected from the Australian population returned a postal survey. FC and IBS-C were defined according to Rome III. The first model used logistic regression to differentiate IBS-C from FC based on life-style, quality-of-life and psychological characteristics. The second approach was data-driven employing latent class analysis (LCA) to identify naturally occurring clusters in the data considering all symptoms involved in the Rome III criteria for IBS-C and FC. Results: We found n = 206 (6.5%; 95% CI 5.7-7.4%) people met strict Rome III FC whereas n = 109 (3.5%; 95% CI 2.8-4.1%) met strict Rome III IBS-C. The case-control approach indicated that FC patients reported an older age at onset of constipation, were less likely to exercise, had higher mental QoL and less health care seeking than IBS-C. LCA yielded one latent class that was predominantly (75%) FC, while the other class was approximately half IBS-C and half FC. The FC-dominated latent class had clearly lower levels of symptoms used to classify IBS (pain-related symptoms) and was more likely to be male (P = 0.046) but was otherwise similar in distribution of lifestyle factors to the mixed class. Conclusion: The latent class analysis approach suggests a differentiation based more on symptom severity rather than the Rome III view.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)856-866
    Number of pages11
    JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
    Volume41
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015

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