Differentiation of the peptidergic vasoregulatory response to standardized splanchnic hypoperfusion by acute hypovolaemia or sepsis in anaesthetized pigs

A. Aneman*, J. Bengtsson, J. Snygg, M. Holm, A. Pettersson, L. Fändriks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was performed to integratively investigate the vasoregulatory response during standardized splanchnic hypoperfusion in pigs. Splanchnic perfusion was reduced to 50% of baseline by: haemorrhage by 20 and 40% of the estimated total blood volume; femoral venous infusion of live E. coli to establish sepsis of systemic origin; portal venous infusion of live E. coli to establish sepsis of splanchnic origin. Invasive haemodynamic monitoring and radioimmunoassay analyses of arterial plasma concentrations of angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide were carried out. Acute hypovolaemia reduced systemic and splanchnic vascular resistances following transient increases and increased angiotensin II levels (+587%), whereas endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide levels did not change significantly. Systemic sepsis following femoral venous infusion of E. coli resulted in increased splanchnic vascular resistance and increased levels of angiotensin II (+274%), endothelin-1 (+134%) and atrial natriuretic peptide (+185%). Infusion of E. coli via the portal venous route induced an increase in splanchnic vascular resistance associated with particularly elevated levels of angiotensin II (+1770%) as well as increased endothelin-1 (+201%) and atrial natriuretic peptide (+229%) concentrations. Hypovolaemia and sepsis, although standardized with a predefined level of splanchnic hypoperfusion, elicited differentiated cardiovascular and vasopeptidergic responses. Sepsis, particularly of portal origin, notably increased splanchnic vascular resistance related to increased production of the vasoconstrictors angiotensin II and endothelin-1. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide as a vasodilator seems to be of subordinate importance in hypovolaemia and sepsis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-300
Number of pages8
JournalActa Physiologica Scandinavica
Volume166
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Angiotensin II
  • Atrial natriuretic peptide
  • Circulatory shock
  • Endothelin-1
  • Intestinal circulation

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