Distressed and drained: intimate partner aggression and the buffering role of supervisor support

Laramie Tolentino, Cheryl Ng, Alessandra Capezio

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The spillover effects of intimate partner aggression (IPA) on the workplace are garnering increasing research interest. Grounded in conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study examines the relationship between IPA and work outcomes (i.e. task performance and organizational citizenship behaviors) through the mediating role of psychological distress. Additionally, the current research investigates perceived supervisor support (PSS) as an organizational buffer against the stress of domestic abuse. Data from 228 matched employee-supervisor dyads from the Philippines showed that a positive relationship between IPA and psychological distress, and further showed that the conditional indirect effects of IPA in predicting work outcomes via psychological distress were stronger at low as opposed to high levels of PSS. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAcademy of Management Proceedings
PublisherAcademy of Management
Pages1013-1018
Number of pages6
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event75th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2015 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 7 Aug 201511 Aug 2015

Conference

Conference75th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2015
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period7/08/1511/08/15

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