Diversifying language acquisition research can be (partly) achieved in urban societies and with simplified methodologies: insights from multilingual Ghana

Paul Okyere Omane*, Titia Benders, Reginald Akuoko Duah, Natalie Boll-Avetisyan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/opinion

Abstract

There is a large consensus (e.g., Cristia, Foushee, Aravena-Bravo, Cychosz, Scaff & Casillas, 2022; Kidd & Garcia, 2022) that diversification in language acquisition research is needed. Cristia et al. (2022) convincingly argue for studying language acquisition in rural populations and recommend combining observational and experimental approaches in doing so. In this commentary, we identify that diversification efforts must also include children growing up in non-western urban societies and that combining experiments with more easy-to-obtain data on language exposure can be a solid method to start with.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)532–536
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Language
Volume50
Issue number3
Early online date15 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • language diversity
  • multilingual language acquisition
  • field-based research

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