Do canvassing and campaigning work? Evidence from the 2001 general election in England

Ron Johnston*, Charles Pattie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last two decades an increasing volume of research has demonstrated the efficacy of constituency campaigns at British general elections, using a range of indicators. In general, the more intense a party's campaign in a constituency, relative to its opponents', the better its performance there. These conclusions have been reached using aggregate-level data, and are confirmed again here in respect of English constituencies at the 2001 election. In addition, however, the novel before-and-after design of the 2001 BES allows us to test for the impact of constituency campaigning at the level of the individual voter. Analyses of these data provide strong supporting evidence to the aggregate-level analyses: people who intended to vote for a party when the campaign started were more likely to do so if it contacted them during the campaign.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBritish Elections & Parties Review
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Group
Pages193-213
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)0203495209, 9780203495209
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Sep 2003

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    Johnston, R., & Pattie, C. (2003). Do canvassing and campaigning work? Evidence from the 2001 general election in England. In British Elections & Parties Review (pp. 193-213). Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203495209