Do differences in phonological processing performance predict gains made by older low-progress readers following intensive literacy intervention?

Simmone Porgorzelski, Kevin Wheldall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The research study examined the gains in single word recognition and oral reading fluency made by a group of low-progress readers following an intensive, systematic skills based reading programme (MULTILIT). Performance on the Phonological Assessment Battery (PhAB) was used to identify 'dyslexic' students (with poor phonological awareness) from 'garden-variety' low-progress readers. It was hypothesised that the identified group of 'dyslexic' students ( N = 16) would make smaller gains in reading outcomes compared to the group of 'garden-variety' low-progress readers ( N = 6). The results did not support the hypothesis since both groups of low-progress readers made substantial gains on both reading measures. Moreover, PhAB sub test scores did not predict size of gains. The results provide evidence for the usefulness of intensive literacy remediation to increase the reading gains of disabled readers despite their status (dyslexic or garden-variety) as a low-progress reader and lend support to those researchers who advocate a non-categorical approach to addressing reading disability. There is tentative evidence to suggest that the inclusion of a short phonological awareness training component for nine students may have impacted favourably on the reading outcomes of the 'dyslexic' group of low-progress readers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-427
Number of pages15
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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