Do individuals' experience and task training really affect software review performance?

Yuk Kuen Wong*, David Wilson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Past research suggests that individuals' experience and task training are the factor to software review performance. However, there is no empirical evidence in the software review literature to show how individuals' experience, task training and performance are connected. As results, the aim of this paper is to presents the important relationships between individuals' experience, task training and software review performance. A laboratory experiment was conducted in autumn 2003 at The University of New South Wales in Australia. One hundred and ninety-two volunteer university students were employed. Subjects were required to detect defects from a design document. The main findings include (1) role experience has a positive effect on performance; (2) working experience in the software industry has a positive effect on performance; (3) task training has no significant effect on performance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Seventh IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering and Applications
EditorsM.H. Hamza
Pages429-434
Number of pages6
Volume7
Publication statusPublished - 2003
EventProceedings of the Seventh IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering and Applications - Marina del Rey, CA, United States
Duration: 3 Nov 20035 Nov 2003

Other

OtherProceedings of the Seventh IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering and Applications
CountryUnited States
CityMarina del Rey, CA
Period3/11/035/11/03

Keywords

  • Experience
  • Software Review
  • Training and Performance

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