Do men and women differ in their course following traumatic brain injury? A preliminary prospective investigation of early outcome

Shameran Slewa-Younan*, Ian J. Baguley, Roxana Heriseanu, Ian D. Cameron, Vicki Pitsiavas, Yugan Mudaliar, Vineet Nayyar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary objective: To examine the effect of a patient's sex on measures of outcome in a matched sample of patients admitted for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). Research design: A prospective multi-centred group comparison study based in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Methods and procedures: Data was collected on 25 women admitted for treatment following non-penetrating TBI. Forty-five men were then matched with regards to age and injury severity. All subjects met the study criteria of having a moderate-to-severe TBI and aged 50 years old or younger. Exclusion criteria included history of previous head injury, psychiatric disturbance and significant alcohol and/or substance abuse. Data included injury details and physiological and psychometric measures of outcome. Main outcomes and results: Women demonstrated better outcomes as indicated by their Glasgow Outcome Scale scores (adjusted for initial injury severity and age at injury odds ratio [OR] 4.2, 95% CI 1.4-12.7) and having shorter Length of Stay (adjusted OR 9.03, 95% CI 3.13-26.08). Conclusions: Understanding the presence of sex differences in outcome following TBI is an emerging area of research. This study indicated that, after matching for initial injury severity and age at injury, women with severe TBI demonstrate a better early outcome than men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Injury
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Injury severity
  • Outcome
  • Sex differences
  • Traumatic brain injury

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