Do user preferences align with human factors assessment scores of drug–drug interaction alerts?

David Lowenstein, Wu Yi Zheng, Rosemary Burke, Eliza Kenny, Anmol Sandhu, Meredith Makeham, Johanna Westbrook, Richard O. Day, Melissa T. Baysari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to assess drug–drug interaction alert interfaces and to examine the relationship between compliance with human factors principles and user-preferences of alerts. Three reviewers independently evaluated drug–drug interaction alert interfaces in seven electronic systems using the Instrument-for-Evaluating-Human-Factors-Principles-in-Medication-Related-Decision-Support-Alerts (I-MeDeSA). Fifty-three doctors and pharmacists completed a survey to rate the alert interfaces from best to worst and reported on liked and disliked features. Human factors compliance and user-preferences of alerts were compared. Statistical analysis revealed no significant association between I-MeDeSA scores and user-preferences. However, the strengths and weaknesses of drug–drug interaction alerts from users’ perspectives were in-line with the human factors constructs evaluated by the I-MeDeSA. I-MeDeSA in its current form, is unable to identify alerts that are preferred by the users. The design principles assessed by I-MeDeSA appear to be sound, but its arbitrary allocation of points to each human factors construct may not reflect the relative importance that the end-users place on different aspects of alert design.

LanguageEnglish
JournalHealth Informatics Journal
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacists
Compliance

Keywords

  • alerts
  • clinical decision support
  • drug–drug interaction
  • human factors
  • usability

Cite this

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title = "Do user preferences align with human factors assessment scores of drug–drug interaction alerts?",
abstract = "This study aimed to assess drug–drug interaction alert interfaces and to examine the relationship between compliance with human factors principles and user-preferences of alerts. Three reviewers independently evaluated drug–drug interaction alert interfaces in seven electronic systems using the Instrument-for-Evaluating-Human-Factors-Principles-in-Medication-Related-Decision-Support-Alerts (I-MeDeSA). Fifty-three doctors and pharmacists completed a survey to rate the alert interfaces from best to worst and reported on liked and disliked features. Human factors compliance and user-preferences of alerts were compared. Statistical analysis revealed no significant association between I-MeDeSA scores and user-preferences. However, the strengths and weaknesses of drug–drug interaction alerts from users’ perspectives were in-line with the human factors constructs evaluated by the I-MeDeSA. I-MeDeSA in its current form, is unable to identify alerts that are preferred by the users. The design principles assessed by I-MeDeSA appear to be sound, but its arbitrary allocation of points to each human factors construct may not reflect the relative importance that the end-users place on different aspects of alert design.",
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Do user preferences align with human factors assessment scores of drug–drug interaction alerts? / Lowenstein, David; Zheng, Wu Yi; Burke, Rosemary; Kenny, Eliza; Sandhu, Anmol; Makeham, Meredith; Westbrook, Johanna; Day, Richard O.; Baysari, Melissa T.

In: Health Informatics Journal, 11.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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