Does reflection help students to develop entrepreneurial capabilities?

Erik Lundmark, Mark Tayar, Karl Qin, Christine Bilsland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recently scholars have suggested that reflection is an important, or even essential, aspect of entrepreneurship teaching. However, there has been little empirical research on the links between reflection and entrepreneurial learning in a university setting. We test the relationship between reflection and learning in a sample of 125 entrepreneurship students. The results show that reflection supports the development of entrepreneurial capabilities as manifested in the change of Perceived Behavioral Control (PBC). We also find that previous startup experience and reflection are positively related to the baseline level of PBC. However, we find no evidence of vicarious learning through family business exposure. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1157-1171
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Small Business Management
Volume57
Issue number3
Early online date7 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

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Students
Telecommunication links
Teaching
Perceived behavioral control
Entrepreneurship
Industry
Entrepreneurial learning
Empirical research
Start-up
Family business
Vicarious learning

Cite this

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Does reflection help students to develop entrepreneurial capabilities? / Lundmark, Erik; Tayar, Mark; Qin, Karl; Bilsland, Christine.

In: Journal of Small Business Management, Vol. 57, No. 3, 07.2019, p. 1157-1171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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