Does sound discrimination training fix specific language and reading impairments?

Genevieve McArthur, Danielle Ellis, Carmen Atkinson, Max Coltheart

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

    Abstract

    Over 100 children with specific language impairment (SLI) or dyslexia were tested for their language, reading, phonological processing, and auditory processing skills (psychophysics and event-related potentials (ERPs)). Children who demonstrate an auditory processing deficit were given sound discrimination training for 6 weeks. Immediately after the training, they were retested for their language, reading, phonological processing, and auditory processing. They were then given a 6-week break before being retested for the same skills. The data will be used to answer 5 questions: (1) how many children with SLI or children with dyslexia have a sound discrimination deficit, (2) does this affect their ability to processing rapid or slow non-speech or speech sounds, (3) what patterns of language, reading, and phonological impairment differentiate children with abnormal and normal sound discrimination, (4) can impaired sound discrimination be fixed with training, (5) and does sound discrimination training have an immediate or delayed impact on language, reading, or phonological processing skills.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)85
    Number of pages1
    JournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
    Volume58
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    Event33rd Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference - University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    Duration: 20 Apr 200623 Apr 2006

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