Does task-focused versus task-avoidance behavior matter for literacy development in an orthographically consistent language?

George K. Georgiou*, George Manolitsis, Jari Erik Nurmi, Rauno Parrila

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the importance of children's classroom activity, defined as task-focused versus task-avoidance behavior, on different literacy outcomes in an orthographically consistent language. Greek children (n = 95) were tested in kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 2 on measures of general cognitive ability, phonological awareness, RAN, and short-term memory. The teachers of the children also assessed their task-focused behavior. Nonword decoding, reading fluency, spelling, and reading comprehension measures were administered in grades 2 and 3. The results indicated that task-focused behavior accounted for unique variance in spelling and reading comprehension, even after controlling for the effects of autoregressor, non-verbal IQ, and phonological processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • task-focused behavior
  • phonological processing
  • longitudinal
  • literacy skills
  • orthographic consistency

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